Popular Internet Privacy Measure Dies At Minnesota’s Capitol

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By Tim Nelson, MPR News

“Internet privacy was a popular idea earlier in the Minnesota legislative session — getting 200 of the 201 votes in previous votes in both the House and Senate.  Lawmakers didn’t want internet service providers to be able to sell information about their customers’ web browsing history.  But that provision didn’t make the final cut in the final jobs budget bill hammered out in the early hours Monday morning at the Capitol.”

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Storage Startup Vets Return w/ $8.65m A for Atavium

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Via News Release

“Minneapolis, MN, May 17, 2017– Atavium, Inc, announced that it has closed an oversubscribed $8.65M Series A funding round led by Rally Ventures and Grotech Ventures, with participation from Origin Ventures, Correlation Ventures, Brightstone Venture Capital and G-Bar Ventures. Atavium has created a unique data management platform that has allowed initial customers to mine, categorize, and maximize the value of their data.”

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Internet Privacy Measure Removed As MN Lawmakers Debate Budget

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By Erin Golden , Star Tribune

“An internet privacy measure that won broad backing from Minnesota lawmakers has been yanked from consideration at the Capitol with little explanation.

The provision had been crafted in response to a recent action by the U.S. Congress and President Donald Trump to loosen online privacy regulations, potentially opening the door for internet service providers to sell the browsing data of customers. It would have prohibited internet providers in Minnesota from collecting personal information without permission from customers.”

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Internet Privacy Effort In Flux At Minnesota Legislature

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By Kyle Potter, Star Tribune

“ST. PAUL, Minn. — Minnesota lawmakers’ attempts to safeguard residents’ internet privacy are in limbo.

Long-simmering privacy concerns about personal information and browsing history bubbled up across the nation after Congress moved to loosen regulations that could potentially allow internet providers to sell customers’ data. The House and Senate voted overwhelmingly earlier this session to bar that data collection in separate bills.”

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Eagan’s ConvergeOne Expands East With NYC Acquisition

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Via News Release

“EAGAN, Minn., April 18, 2017 — ConvergeOne, a leading global provider of state-of-the-art communications and data solutions, today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire Rockefeller Group Technology Solutions (RGTS), a Unified Communications as a Service pioneer based in New York. Required regulatory and government approvals to complete the transaction will occur in the coming weeks.”

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Minnesota Races To Protect Internet Privacy Protections As Trump, Congress Undo Them

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By Judy Keen, Star Tribune

“Legislators in Minnesota and at least nine other states are racing to enact online privacy protections after President Donald Trump signed a law that allows internet providers to collect and sell information about customers without their consent.”

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Sansoro Health Banks $5.2 A Round Led By Bain For EMR Tech

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Via News Release

Screen Shot 2017-04-13 at 7.33.59 AMSansoro Health, an award-winning pioneer in data integration for health care, today announced that it has closed $5.2 million in Series A funding led by Bain Capital Ventures. Sansoro Health makes it easy to exchange real-time health care data between digital health applications and electronic medical records (EMRs).

The new funding will be used to expand sales, marketing and operations to accelerate Sansoro Health’s vision of transforming health care IT ecosystems through real-time digital health interoperability.”

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Spark DJ App Adds A Professional Spin To Mixes

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By Jackie Renzetti, Star Tribune

James Jones had the problem that every college student wants: too many paid gigs.  While studying engineering and economics at the University of Notre Dame, he DJed three to four parties each weekend, and picked up opening slots for big-name acts like Big Sean. But he started stretching himself too thin, so he built a program that mixed music and took requests. He offered it to customers at a discounted price.”

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