The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) has announced another round of Launch Minnesota Innovation Grants. After awarding more than 40 startups with grants during the first, second, and third rounds, DEED has announced another 12 grants ($255,390) to the group. The total for all four rounds clocks in at nearly $1.5 million of the $1.6 million appropriation for 2020.

Ten technology startups were given the 12 new grants (seven for business operations, three for housing and child care, and two for SBIR). In round four, 30% of the businesses are women or minority owned.

“We’re glad to be able to help support Minnesota businesses finding innovative solutions to real world problems.” — Neela Mollgaard

“These startups are developing everything from helmets to protect workers from airborne contaminants to a platform to help track the academic progress of middle and high school students,” Neela Mollgaard, Executive Director of Launch Minnesota, said in a release. “We’re glad to be able to help support Minnesota businesses finding innovative solutions to real world problems.”

The fourth-round grantees of 2020 (with descriptions by DEED) are:

Berd, St. Louis Park

Producing hybrid metal and polymer cycling products, including super lightweight bicycle spokes.

Cambridge Technologies, Worthington

Developing herd specific vaccines for veterinarians.

MFr Technologies, Maple Grove

Developing surgical instrument to help regenerate cartilage in joints.

Nanodropper, Rochester 

Developing an eyedrop bottle adaptor that increases access to expensive eyedrop medications by reducing waste.

Poma 22, Mendota Heights

Created a helmet with high-powered air duct system that provides an ear-to-ear air curtain to shield workers from airborne contaminants.

RenewPower, Minneapolis 

Developed a modular, renewable-energy based power generation and storage system.

Stratix Labs, St. Paul

Developing ready-to-go anti-biofilm and anti-sanitizer test kits.

UR Turn, Minneapolis

Building a platform that tracks academic progress of middle and high school students.

Visana Health, St. Paul

Developing an app for women with severe menstrual pain.

Visyn, Minneapolis

Building a holographic system to learn movement skill for sports and medical markets.